DREAM in the City: Dr. Bhupinder Singh, Henderson Group Vet Clinics

Dr. Bhupinder (Tony) Singh of Henderson Group Vet Clinics will be joining DREAM in the City both as a vendor and as a keynote speaker. Dr. Singh will be taking questions from the audience to make the most of your time! Are you curious why your pet requires heartworm prevention every year? Or what tick borne diseases your pet might be susceptible to? Bring your questions on Saturday for a free opportunity for vetting advice!

Since April 2000, Dr. Singh has worked mostly out of Henderson Animal Hospital. He is a part of six veterinary clinics called “Henderson Group” who offer top of the line veterinary services to pet owners across Winnipeg. Henderson, Alpine, Sage Creek, Southglen, Fort Garry and Stonewall Animal Hospitals provide professional and loving health care to all their clients. With six clinics across Winnipeg and one in Stonewall MB, Henderson Group has a clinic you can trust and count on.

ImageDr. Singh grew up on a farm in a village in Northern India, where he was exposed to a variety of animals such as cows, buffaloes, sheep goats, dogs, cats and more. He worked for three years in a mixed animal practice doing preventative and therapeutic medicine.

Dr. Singh’s love for animals also includes his 13 year old cat, Annie. Outside veterinary medicine, he enjoys traveling, meeting people around the globe and is keen on religious studies.

We are thrilled to offer this Q&A session with Dr. Tony SIngh. What a great opportunity to ask your pet’s health care questions and learn more about the importance of basic pet care!

Visit DREAM in the City: Manitoba Canine Expo on Saturday, June 22nd from 11:00am to 4:00pm, located at Four Points Sheraton South (2935 Pembina Hwy), where Dr. Singh will be among five keynote speakers, including Neil Sedlacek and Asmara Polcyn! More information at www.dreamrescue.ca.

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Trainer Tuesday: Stress from Moving

 

Every Tuesday we will be working with certified dog trainer Lisa from The Noble Hound, Dog Training and Obedience to answer your dog training questions. If you have a question about your pooch, whether it be leash manners, house training, getting along with other animals or anything in between, email us at info@dreamrescue.ca and we will pick a few questions each week to answer.

Erin Dyck: Hi Lisa! We are moving soon, and so our house is in a bit of chaos (more so than usual). There are boxes everywhere, and the dogs obviously know something is up.

They are a bit touchy; the little guys are growling at everyone as they do when they feel stressed out, and Spencer, our only male, has started marking around the house (just little dribbles; he’s still using the great outdoors for “real” bathroom breaks).

What can I do to minimize the stress on them, other than sticking to their regular routine?

Hi Erin,

Congratulations on buying a new house! Moving can be an exciting adventure, but also very stressful for both humans and animals involved. You are absolutely right in keeping up with the dogs’ daily routine. Right now the moving boxes are stressing your dogs out, so switch their brains and make the boxes and chaos fun and beneficial to them! Boxes can be fun right?! Hide some treats and favorite toys among the moving boxes, making the boxes a bit more exciting and valuable for the dogs. Get the dogs to jump over and/or weave around the boxes and play games around the boxes and chaos, but make sure to reward your dogs with their favorite things (food, treats, toys, affection) for being so brave and happy. The key is to make the boxes fun and rewarding!

Another thing you can do is try to exercise the dogs a little extra. Poop them out so that they don’t have the extra energy to convert into anxiety. A tired dog is a dog that isn’t going to think too much!

As for your dog that is marking, try to re-direct just before you see that leg going up. Make sure he’s never around the moving items and boxes unsupervised. The more he gets to practice this behaviour unsupervised, the more he’s going to do it. You want to catch him before he pees and interrupt him before anything comes out. You can say something like “aaaak” to re-direct his silly ideas.

If your dogs need to go somewhere else (a familiar place like another family member’s home) while the move is taking place that is okay too. I suggest doing this on the actual moving day.

Also, if you have access to the new house already, I would take the dogs there to explore a few times before the final move. This will allow them to develop positive associations to the new house. Let them have fun at the new place – interact and play with the dogs, let them do things they love to do, give them some tasty bones or Kongs stuffed with cheese, meat or peanut butter. Make the new place a great place to be!

In general, it’s natural for your dogs to be a little upset about change. That is normal, but you can help them out by making the situation a bit more enjoyable and fun!

Dream Dog Friday: Mabel’s puppies

In Manitoba there are many dog rescue groups that help save the lives of many dogs. Mabel’s puppies are very lucky that Manitoba Underdogs Rescue took their mom, heartworm positive, underweight and pregnant, into care.

On March 20 Mabel naturally gave birth to Noah before having a c-section to remove her other nine pups, including two stillborns. After giving birth, Mabel was only 35 lbs, though she should have been about 50 lbs.

Mabel’s pups Archer, Winston, Dennis, Albert, Harold, Henry, Noah and Beauregard were given to a surrogate mother, a dog named Ruby whose litter had recently been adopted out.

Erin Dyck (D.R.E.A.M.’s Director of Finance and Administration) looked after the group. She said Ruby couldn’t feed the boys long because she soon stopped producing milk.  The puppies had to be bottle fed every two hours, even through the night.

When Archer was 10 days old, Erin noticed he was lethargic early in the day. By the afternoon the poor guy could hardly breath. The vet determined he had pneumonia and he was euthanized.

A few days later Winston was taken to the vet for antibiotics. He spent a week in bed under the covers to keep warm and needed to have fluids injected under his skin. Thankfully, he recovered.

The seven puppies are now healthy, thriving, and dreaming of their furever homes… Maybe you can help them get there?