Living with a 4-Pack

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We have four dogs of our own now … not entirely sure how that happened, but we love ‘em all! Mia, our 8 year old from Pembina Valley Humane Society, Shodan, 4 years, Funds for Furry Friends, Lexxie, 3 years, Winnipeg Animals Services and Paisley, 7 months, Manitoba Mutts Dog Rescue.

Living with multiple dogs can be rewarding and a lot of fun. It does come with it’s fair share of training and cooperation amongst the family. Three tips to live harmoniously with multiple dogs:

  1. Be sure to spend individual time with each dog to maintain a strong bond with them. It is important to give each dog the opportunity to connect individually with you and your family to improve their listening skills and overall behaviour while with the full pack.

  2. Provide plenty of resources for your dogs – bones, food bowls, beds, etc – to avoid the need to take turns or fight over things.

  3. Teach your dogs respect and manners for one another. Do not give your dogs attention for barking at, jumping on or nudging you. While giving attention to one dog, if another dog intrudes, ignore it by turning your back, looking away and standing up with your arms crossed. Once the dog realizes its behaviour did not work or loses interest, return to the dog who you were giving your attention to.

If you’re looking to add a second (or third or fourth!) dog to your family, be patient, choose wisely and put in the time training each of your dogs. Your dogs reap the benefits of extra socialization and mental stimulation!

Dream Dog Friday: Mabel’s puppies

In Manitoba there are many dog rescue groups that help save the lives of many dogs. Mabel’s puppies are very lucky that Manitoba Underdogs Rescue took their mom, heartworm positive, underweight and pregnant, into care.

On March 20 Mabel naturally gave birth to Noah before having a c-section to remove her other nine pups, including two stillborns. After giving birth, Mabel was only 35 lbs, though she should have been about 50 lbs.

Mabel’s pups Archer, Winston, Dennis, Albert, Harold, Henry, Noah and Beauregard were given to a surrogate mother, a dog named Ruby whose litter had recently been adopted out.

Erin Dyck (D.R.E.A.M.’s Director of Finance and Administration) looked after the group. She said Ruby couldn’t feed the boys long because she soon stopped producing milk.  The puppies had to be bottle fed every two hours, even through the night.

When Archer was 10 days old, Erin noticed he was lethargic early in the day. By the afternoon the poor guy could hardly breath. The vet determined he had pneumonia and he was euthanized.

A few days later Winston was taken to the vet for antibiotics. He spent a week in bed under the covers to keep warm and needed to have fluids injected under his skin. Thankfully, he recovered.

The seven puppies are now healthy, thriving, and dreaming of their furever homes… Maybe you can help them get there?